Stink bean

Stink bean

Paraserianthes lophantha (Fabaceae)

Common Name:

Stink bean

Scientific Name:

Paraserianthes lophantha (Fabaceae)


Alternative common names:

Australian albizia; Cape wattle; crested wattle; silk tree (English), stinkboon; sirus (Afrikaans)

Description:

 
A fine bi-pinnate leaved evergreen shrub or tree growing 4-6m high, somewhat resembling the large-leafed black wattle (Acacia mearnsii). The dark green leaves are paler below, up to 300 mm or longer and golden-hairy. Cream-coloured flowers appear in dense, bottlebrush-like heads from June-August followed by brown compressed seed pods with raised edges. The seeds emit a nauseating odour when crushed and this tree is poisonous. It invades forest margins, river banks, moist slopes in fynbos and wooded kloofs.

Additional Information


Where does this species come from?

Australia

What is its invasive status in South Africa?

Existing legislation: CARA 2002 - Category 1 NEMBA - Category 1b

Where in South Africa is it a problem?

Western and Eastern Cape Provinces

How does it spread?

It spreads by seeds

Why is it a problem?

It competes with and replaces indigenous species. Dense stands along watercourses are likely to reduce stream flow

What does it look like?

General description: Evergreen shrub or tree growing 4-6m high which resembles the large-leafed black wattle (Acacia mearnsii).
Leaves: Bipinnate, dark green leaves, paler below, up to 300 mm or longer and golden-hairy.
Flowers: Cream-coloured flowers appear in dense, bottlebrush-like heads from June-August.
Fruit/Seeds: Brown compressed seed pods with raised edges. The seeds emit a nauseating odour when crushed

Does the plant have any uses?

Used as an ornament and as a honey source

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