Cluster pine

Cluster pine

Pinus pinaster (Pinaceae)

Common Name:

Cluster pine

Scientific Name:

Pinus pinaster (Pinaceae)


Alternative common names:

Trosden (Afrikaans)

Description:

 
 A coniferous tree 8-15m high, conical when young, becoming cylindrical with a tall, bare trunk when older. Reddish-brown bark, deeply cracked into plates. Dull grey-green leaf needles in bundles of two. Cones initially purple, turning light brown 9-18cm long. This pine invades mountains and lowland fynbos

Additional Information


Where does this species come from?

Mediterranean

What is its invasive status in South Africa?

CARA 2002 - Category 2 NEMBA 2020 - a. 2 for plantations and wind-rows. b. 1b elsewhere. c. National Heritage Trees or National Monument Trees in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act, 1999, (Act No. 25 of 1999), are not listed.

Where does this species come from?

Mediterranean

Where in South Africa is it a problem?

Western Cape

How does it spread?

Spreads by seed dispersal from the cones

Why is it a problem?

Competes with and replaces indigenous species. Dense stands can reduce water runoff and stream flow from mountain catchments, reduce grazing, and pose a fire hazard which threatens the survival of indigenous animal and plant species

What does it look like?

General description: Coniferous tree 8-15m high; conical when young, becoming cylindrical with a tall, bare trunk when older; bark reddish-brown, deeply cracked into plates.
Leaves: Needles, dull grey-green, in bundles of two, long (80-240 mm), thick and rigid.
Flowers: Does not produce any flowers.
Fruit/Seeds: Produces woody purple cones which turn light brown, 90-180mm long, shortly stalked, often clustered and persistent

Does the plant have any uses?

Used for timber

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