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German wasp | Vespula germanica

German wasp

Vespula germanica

Coral bush | Ardisia crenata

Coral bush

Ardisia crenata

Purple loosestrife | Lythrum salicaria

Purple loosestrife

Lythrum salicaria

Pom pom weed | Campuloclinium macrocephalum

Pom pom weed

Campuloclinium macrocephalum

Canarybird bush | Crotalaria agatiflora

Canarybird bush

Crotalaria agatiflora

Peanut butter cassia | Senna didymobotrya

Peanut butter cassia

Senna didymobotrya

Rubber vine | Cryptostegia grandiflora

Rubber vine

Cryptostegia grandiflora

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Environmental Programmes

In order to tackle our country’s socio-economic challenges, the government adopted the Outcomes based approach to improve government performance and providing focus on service delivery. find out more

Invasive Species South Africa - Protecting Biodiversity from Invasion - Items filtered by date: July 2017

Do you have indoor plants that are listed as invasive species in your home? Are you buying or selling indoor plants illegally? Did you know that the following indoor plants have trade restrictions placed on them? 

Indoor plants listed under the National Environmental Management Biodiversity (NEMBA) Act [No. 10 of 2004] include:

Nephrolepis cordifolia - Erect sword fern, Ladder sword fern (including ANY cultivars or hybrids of this species)
a. 1b in Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Western Cape
b. 3 in Free State, Gauteng, North-West and Northern Cape.

Which means it cannot be bought or sold... ie NO TRADE in ANY province.

Nephrolepis exaltata - Sword fern, Boston sword fern (including ANY cultivars or hybrids of this species)
a. 1b in Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Western Cape
b. 3 in Free State, Gauteng, North-West and Northern Cape

Which means it cannot be bought or sold... ie NO TRADE in ANY province.

Syngonium podophyllum - Goose foot, Arrow- head vine
a. 1b in Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga
b. Not listed elsewhere.
Which means it can be traded... in ONLY Gauteng, North West, N Cape and Western Cape

Schefflera actinophylla - Australian cabbage tree, Queensland umbrella tree
a. 1b in Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga
b. Not listed elsewhere.
Which means it can be traded.. in ONLY Gauteng, Free State, North West, N Cape and Western Cape

Schefflera arboricola - Dwarf umbrella tree
a. 3 in Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga.
b. Not listed elsewhere.
Which means it can be traded... in ONLY Gauteng, Free State, North West, N Cape and Western Cape

Schefflera elegantissima - False aralia
a. 3 in Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and Mpumalanga.
b. Not listed elsewhere.
Which means it can be traded... in ONLY Gauteng, Free State, North West, N Cape and Western Cape

What does the law say about categories of invasive species?

It is illegal to trade in ANY listed invasive plant species (including Category 1a, 1b, 2 or 3) in South Africa according to the National Environmental Management Biodiversity Act [No. 10 of 2004].

The NEMBA Alien and Invasive Species Regulations law came into effect on 1 October 2014. Since that date, it has been illegal to trade in any listed invasive species plants that are in greenhouses.

Fines can be issued to non-compliant growers, but no fines or directives have been placed on growers that destroyed plants in a bonfire and have the visual images to prove it.

Should your greenhouses be reported for housing listed invasive species, the organisation that owns the property on which the illegal plants are found will be the receiver of the fines.

What about indoor plants that are deemed to be sterile cultivars?

In April 2014, SANA negotiated a 'Sterile Cultivar List' which became a memorandum on listed invasive species - which the industry believed to be sterile.

On 14 February 2017, a delegation from SAGIC met with the Biosecurity officials at the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA). A geneticist with specialisations in invasive species gave the main talk.

During this speech, it was shown that the science behind invasive species has moved on dramatically since 2014 and the request to use Sterile Hybrids of any Nephrolepsis species was shown to be scientifically indefensible.

The delegation from the green industries formally accepted, on 14 February 2017, that all 'sterile' exemptions for Nephrolepsis species would fall away with immediate effect.

Regretfully, hybrids of Nephrolepsis exaltata are no longer given any type of permission (legal or informal) to be used in the trade as from 14 February, 2017.
The indoor plant trade is one of the introduction pathways of invasive species into gardens and property.

The risk related to species kept in greenhouses and the risk of their introduction into gardens is associated with plant growers who still trade invasive plants.

What if you already have these plants?

If you have these plants in your home or garden, you will have to destroy any Category 1a, 1b or 2 species without permits.

If you are a grower, you absolutely have to destroy all Category 1a, 1b, 2 and 3 species as you may not trade in listed invasive species.
Growers have found that it is very useful to have images of a bonfire in which you removed all your invasive species on record in the industry, should you need to deflect a fine that may come through from the reporting of an invasive plant still on a client’s property.

Burning is the only acceptable way of destroying stock if you are a grower or currently own illegal invasive plants.

The South African government have spent millions of taxpayer’s money on controlling invasive species and mitigating the damage caused by these invaders in ecosystems. It is your duty of care to assist in the preservation of biodiversity in South Africa by make sure that any invasive species on your property are controlled and destroyed.

 

General News Updates

2019 National Symposium on Biological Invasio…

26-02-2019

This is your invitation to South Africa's 2019 National Symposium on Biological Invasions. The convention is hosted by the Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), University of Stellenbosch, and the Biolo... Read more

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22-01-2019

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On 16 February, 2018, South Africa's Department of Environmental Affairs issued amendments to the regulations and lists relating to the National List of Invasive Species.  Updates to the draft&n... Read more

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28-02-2018

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25-01-2018

The Nature Conservancy has advertised a brand new post:  Communications Manager, Africa Region. Knowledge of invasive species and water would be an asset in this post. See details below:    Job Titl... Read more