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German wasp | Vespula germanica

German wasp

Vespula germanica

Coral bush | Ardisia crenata

Coral bush

Ardisia crenata

Purple loosestrife | Lythrum salicaria

Purple loosestrife

Lythrum salicaria

Pom pom weed | Campuloclinium macrocephalum

Pom pom weed

Campuloclinium macrocephalum

Canarybird bush | Crotalaria agatiflora

Canarybird bush

Crotalaria agatiflora

Peanut butter cassia | Senna didymobotrya

Peanut butter cassia

Senna didymobotrya

Rubber vine | Cryptostegia grandiflora

Rubber vine

Cryptostegia grandiflora

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Environmental Programmes

In order to tackle our country’s socio-economic challenges, the government adopted the Outcomes based approach to improve government performance and providing focus on service delivery. find out more

Controlling Carcinus maenas in Hout Bay harbour: the first attempted extirpation of a marine invasive species in Africa

Controlling Carcinus maenas in Hout Bay harbour: the first attempted extirpation of a marine invasive species in Africa
Clova A. MABIN1,2, John R. Wilson1,3, Johannes J. Le Roux1, Kerry J. Sink2Tamara B. Robinson
1Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University, Matieland 7602, South Africa
2Marine Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, P/Bag X7, Claremont 7735, Cape Town, South Africa
3Invasive Species Programme, South African National Biodiversity Institute, Kirstenbosch Research Centre, P/Bag X7, Claremont 7735, Cape Town, South Africa

The European shore crab, Carcinus maenas, is a global invader with ecological impacts across most of its invasive range. It was first detected in South Africa in 1983 and is currently confined to two large harbour populations, approximately 30 km apart. In 2013, the population in Hout Bay harbour was estimated to support 6 700 mature individuals. The crab is listed as a NEM:BA 1b species (i.e. a species requiring control) and as a result, a pilot control programme was initiated in Hout Bay. Several capture methods were trialled including the use of baited traps, diver collection and dredging. Both divers and dredging were found not to be cost effective so baited traps were used in the trial extirpation. After 219 trapping days, 36 244 crabs were captured. Catch Per Unit Effort (CPUE) declined over the 12 month project. Following the termination of the programme, the population was monitored for six months and CPUE increased over this period. We conclude that eradication of C. maenas from South Africa would require resource-intensive control programmes in both harbours, but without strong evidence of impacts by this species in South Africa, it is hard to justify a large-scale eradication programme without knowledge of why control failed in Hout Bay. This study was the first attempt at controlling a marine invasive species in Africa and provides important insights for the control of other marine species.

Read 3199 times Last modified on Tuesday, 03 May 2016 12:11

General News Updates

2019 National Symposium on Biological Invasio…

26-02-2019

This is your invitation to South Africa's 2019 National Symposium on Biological Invasions. The convention is hosted by the Centre for Invasion Biology (CIB), University of Stellenbosch, and the Biolo... Read more

2019 Invasive Species Training

22-01-2019

During the past five years (2014-2018), ISSA invasive species trainers have trained 4 000 in the identification of invasive species and laws pertaining to invasive species across South Africa.  ... Read more

Alien Grass Working Group

04-09-2018

Who are we? The South African National Alien Grass Working Group was jointly initiated by the South African Biodiversity Institute (SANBI) and the Centre for Excellence in Invasion Biology (C·I·B) in... Read more

Permits for planting indigenous Cynodon?

01-03-2018

On 16 February, 2018, South Africa's Department of Environmental Affairs issued amendments to the regulations and lists relating to the National List of Invasive Species.  Updates to the draft&n... Read more

Invasive species training 2018 dates released

28-02-2018

Interested in invasive species?  How much do you know about NEMBA invasive species compliance for landowners and organs of state? The South African Green Industries Council (SAGIC) have released... Read more

Communications post for Africa advertised

25-01-2018

The Nature Conservancy has advertised a brand new post:  Communications Manager, Africa Region. Knowledge of invasive species and water would be an asset in this post. See details below:    Job Titl... Read more