Banana poka  is a vigorous, scrambling, smothering plant that climbs up to 10 m high by means of its tendrils. It can smother trees, reducing native biodiversity and its fruit can encourage pest animals such as rats. Declared weed, prohibited and must be controlled in South Africa.

Published in Invasive Plants

A glabrous, perennial, tendril climber with cylindrical or slightly angular stems, growing to 5m or higher. The leaves are usually deeply five- to seven-lobed and with sickle-shaped stipules. The flowers are about 10cm diameter with 5 sepals and petals that are similar in appearance. Produces yellow or orange, ovoid berries which are reddish inside. This plant invades forest margins, bush clumps, roadsides and river banks.

Published in Invasive Plants

A long-lived (perennial) vine with stems often climbing up over other vegetation 6-10m tall, occasionally reaching 15m in height. It produces underground tubers and loses its leaves during the dry season in areas seasonal rains.

Published in Invasive Plants

A tendril climber reaching up to 6m high which is smooth to densely hairy. The stems become corky when older. It has deeply three-lobed leaves and the flowers have greenish-yellow sepals and no petals. Flowers appear from November to April followed by a  purple or black fruit. Poisonous stems, leaves and unripe fruit. It invades forests, woodlands, bush clumps, roadsides, river banks and coastal dunes.

Published in Invasive Plants

Distinguished by climbing habitat; leaves with heart-shaped base, leaf stalk twisted and with a stipule like small leaf at the base; flowers showy, made up of large pipe – shaped, petal-like calyx fruit an oblong capsule, ending in a projection; seeds tear-drop shaped. 

Published in Invasive Plants
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