The African tulip tree is an evergreen species indigenous to western Africa. It has been introduced throughout the tropics and is threatening biodiversity in many parts of the Pacific islands. It favours moist habitats and will grow best in sheltered tropical areas. The tree invades both abandoned agricultural land and closed forest. This species loves rich soil, but puts up with just about any type of soil.

Published in Invasive Plants

Rubus ellipticus is a stout evergreen shrub with prickly stem that grows approximately 4.5 metres tall. Its stems are covered with prickles and reddish hairs. It has been introduced to several places, including Hawaii, Southern USA and the UK, and is grown in cultivation for its edible fruits. This plant has become a major pest in Hawai'i, threatening its own native species of raspberry (Rubus hawaiiensis), and the ability of this plant to thrive in diverse habitat types makes it a particularly threatening invasive plant.

Published in Invasive Plants

A large, evergreen tree 18-30m high with a straight trunk and moderately spreading crown. Leaves are dark green above and greyish-white or rusty-silk beneath and have a fern-like profile. Golden-orange flowers in terminal, bottle-brush-like sprays from September to November. Brownish-black, leathery fruits contain up to two winged seeds

Published in Invasive Plants

Banana poka  is a vigorous, scrambling, smothering plant that climbs up to 10 m high by means of its tendrils. It can smother trees, reducing native biodiversity and its fruit can encourage pest animals such as rats. Declared weed, prohibited and must be controlled in South Africa.

Published in Invasive Plants

A tall evergreen tree up to 40m high with arching, slender branches. Leaves have minute scales in whorls and are very much pine-like. The male flowers appear as yellowish spikes and female flowers in reddish heads from September to April and this tree produces small brown woody cones about 20mm long

Published in Invasive Plants
Page 1 of 13