The Algerian ash is a medium-sized, deciduous tree growing to 20–30m tall with a trunk up to 1.5m in diameter. It is not commonly planted anymore, however large numbers of adult trees can still be seen growing in suburban areas. The flowers are produced in inflorescences, which can be male, hermaphrodite or mixed male and hermaphrodite. Flowering occurs in early spring.

Published in Invasive Plants

Deciduous tree 10 to 20 m high with a spreading crown and often more than one trunk; bark is greenish smooth at first, aging to brown and rough. Leaves bright green, paler and sometimes densely hairy beneath, turning yellow in autumn; 3 – 9 pinnate, but mostly with 5 leaflets; leaflets coarsely toothed, 50 – 100 mm long. 

This fast-growing species is particularly invasive along waterways (i.e. in riparian areas) and in sheltered forests in temperate zones, but it has the potential to invade other habitats.

Published in Invasive Plants

A large, evergreen tree 18-30m high with a straight trunk and moderately spreading crown. Leaves are dark green above and greyish-white or rusty-silk beneath and have a fern-like profile. Golden-orange flowers in terminal, bottle-brush-like sprays from September to November. Brownish-black, leathery fruits contain up to two winged seeds

Published in Invasive Plants

A small evergreen tree, growing 3-6m in height with branchlets covered in greyish or silvery-blue foliage. Leaves are 20-50mm long and are arranged around branchlets spirally.

Flowers which bloom in July to September, are bright yellow, globular shaped with showy sprays.  Fruits are greyish-brown pods, approximately 100mm in length.

Published in Invasive Plants

An impressively large, soft-wooded, semi-evergreen tree capable of growing 12-20m high, with a short, buttressed trunk and a hugely branched, rounded crown. The leaves and stems are succulent. It has bright green leaves about 70mm long which oval-shaped terminating in a gentle point with smooth margins. Creamy-yellow flowers appear in clusters about 100mm long with male and female flowers appearing on separate trees from September-December. This tree produces berry-like fruits which are initially green then turning black, almost resembling a mulberry. It invades savanna, fynbos, coastal bush, river banks, roadsides and urban open spaces.

Published in Invasive Plants
Page 1 of 11