The addax is a desert-living antelope and is well adapted to its harsh habitat. It feeds on desert grasses and scrub. It travels great distances over the Sahara Desert searching for sparse vegetation. It is the most desert-adapted of the antelopes. It spends most of its life without drinking water, receiving enough moisture to survive from the vegetation on which it feeds. 

Published in Invasive Animals

A coniferous tree growing up to 15m high, conical in shape with a short trunk when young and rounded to oblong with a crooked trunk when older. Crown open with silvery-grey bark becoming darker. Grey-green to yellow-green leaf needles in bundles of two 4-8cm long. It invades grasslands and fynbos, particularly on dry soils

Published in Invasive Plants

The alligator snapping turtle is one of the largest freshwater turtles in the world.  It’s a carnivore that feeds primarily on fish, smaller turtles, crayfish, and mollusks (mussels and snails), but occasionally eats juvenile alligators, small mammals, ducks, amphibians, carrion, fruit, and acorns. 

Published in Invasive Animals

Amethistina python is a non-venomous snake, killing its prey by constriction after grabbing it in its jaws or with its body. It’s Australia’s largest snake, growing to lengths of 8.5 metres, but more commonly 3.5-7.5 metres.  

Published in Invasive Animals

Australian Blackwood is a tree up to 20 m high, with a bole of about 150 cm in diameter. The bark on older trunks is dark greyish-black in colour, deeply fissured and somewhat scaly. Younger branches areribbed, angular, or flattened towards their tips and are greenish in colour.

These branchletsare usually mostly hairless (glabrousorglabrescent), but the stems of younger plants are sometimes more obviously hairy (denselypubescent).

Published in Invasive Plants
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