Common Myna

Acridotheres tristis
Common myna :Acridotheres tristis Common myna :Acridotheres tristis

Common name:

Common myna

Scientific name:

Acridotheres tristis

:

A medium-sized chocolate-brown bird, with a yellow beak, eye patch, feet and legs. The head, throat and tail are black, with the tail having white tips and white undertail feathers. The large white patches in the wings are noticeably visible when the bird is in flight. Native to India, central and southern Asia. These birds compete for the same resources as indigenous species. 

Additional Info

  • Where does this species come from?

    India, as well as central and southern Asia

    What is its invasive status in South Africa?

    NEMBA Category 3

    Where in South Africa is it a problem?

    Probably minimal in natural and rural habitats. Mostly found in KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape, Gauteng, Western Cape, Mpumalanga, North-West and Free State Provinces.

    How does it spread?

    Reproduces profusely.

    Why is it a problem?

    Common mynas are aggressive and compete for the same resources as indigenous birds. They are also known to eat the eggs and attack the fledglings of other birds.

    What does it look like?

    Description: The common myna is a medium-sized chocolate-brown bird with a yellow beak, eye patch, feet and legs. The head, throat and tail are black, with the tail having white tips and white undertail feathers. The large white patches in the wings are noticeably visible when the bird is in flight. Habitat: Open agricultural areas such as farmlands as well as cities. They are often found on the outskirts of towns, outlying homesteads in deserts or forests and also common in dry woodlands and partly open forests. Breeding: Common mynas reach sexual maturity around 1 year of age. Females lay four to five eggs in a clutch. The incubation period is 13 to 18 days, during which both parents incubate the eggs. The nestlings may leave the nest at around twenty-two days or longer, but may still not be able to fly for another seven days or so. Depending on their geographic location, common mynas have been reported to breed anywhere from 1 to 3 times a season