Banana poka  is a vigorous, scrambling, smothering plant that climbs up to 10 m high by means of its tendrils. It can smother trees, reducing native biodiversity and its fruit can encourage pest animals such as rats. Declared weed, prohibited and must be controlled in South Africa.

Published in Invasive Plants

The banana root borer is a major pest of the banana plant and infests all types of bananas. The insect originated in Southeast Asia and has spread to all the important banana and plantain plantations in the world. It is not usually a pest in its area of origin.

Published in Invasive Animals

The bleeding heart tree is a small bushy shrub or tree reaching 6m. The trunk is pale grey to brown and smooth. The flowers are yellow-green to red, small, in terminal spikes 60–100mm long. Fruit is a green, two-lobed capsule, up to 10mm long with a yellow, oily aril. The leaves are poisonous to cattle and it contains latex, which can cause skin irritations.

Published in Invasive Plants

A perennial herb growing up to 1m high with spreading branches which are softly downy when young. It has light green, thin leaves which are oval in profile with smooth margins. White or greenish to rosy flowers appear from October to June and this plant produces bright red berries. The leaves, roots and fruit are poisonous.

Published in Invasive Plants

A glabrous, perennial, tendril climber with cylindrical or slightly angular stems, growing to 5m or higher. The leaves are usually deeply five- to seven-lobed and with sickle-shaped stipules. The flowers are about 10cm diameter with 5 sepals and petals that are similar in appearance. Produces yellow or orange, ovoid berries which are reddish inside. This plant invades forest margins, bush clumps, roadsides and river banks.

Published in Invasive Plants
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